How to Track Glowing Balls in 3D

Note: I started writing this article in June 2017, because people kept asking me about details of the PS Move tracking algorithm I implemented for the video in Figure 1. But I never finished it because I couldn’t find the time to do all the measurements needed for a thorough error analysis, and also because the derivation of the linear system at the core of the algorithm really needed some explanatory diagrams, and those take a lot of work. So the article stayed on the shelf. I’m finally publishing it today, without error analysis or diagrams, because people are still asking me about details of the algorithm, more than four years after I published the video. 🙂

This one is long overdue. Back in 2015, on September 30th to be precise, I uploaded a video showing preliminary results from a surprisingly robust optical 3D tracking algorithm I had cooked up specifically to track PS Move controllers using a standard webcam (see Figure 1).

Figure 1: A video showing my PS Move tracking algorithm, and my surprised face.

During discussion of that video, I promised to write up the algorithm I used, and to release source code. But as it sometimes happens, I didn’t do either. I was just reminded of that by an email I received from one of the PS Move API developers. So, almost two years late, here is a description of the algorithm. Given that PSVR is now being sold in stores, and that PS Move controllers are more wide-spread than ever, and given that the algorithm is interesting in its own right, it might still be useful. Continue reading

New Adventures in Hi-Fi

I’ve been spending all of my time over the last few weeks completely rewriting Vrui‘s collaboration infrastructure (VCI from now on), from scratch. VCI is, in a nutshell, the built-in remote collaboration / tele-presence component of my VR toolkit. Or, in other words, a networked multi-player framework. The old VCI was the technology underlying videos such as this one:

Figure 1: Collaborative exploration of a 3D CAT scan of a microbial community, between a CAVE and a 3D TV with head-tracked glasses and a tracked controller.

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A Blast From The Past

Back in the olden days, in the summer of 1996 to be precise, I was a computer science Master’s student at the University of Karlsruhe, Germany, about to take the oral exam in my specialization area, 3D computer graphics, 3D user interfaces, and geometric modeling. For reasons that are no longer entirely clear to me, I decided then that it would be a good idea to prepare for that exam by developing a 3D rendering engine, a 3D game engine, and a game, all from scratch. What resulted from that effort — which didn’t help my performance in that exam at all, by the way — was “Starglider Pro:”

In the mid to late 80s, one of my favorite games on my beloved Atari ST was the original Starglider, developed by Jez San for Rainbird Software. I finally replaced that ST with a series of PCs in 1993, first running DOS, and later OS/2 Warp, and therefore needed something to scratch that Starglider itch. Continue reading